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Picture of Tube Record Player Restoration
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Recently, I bought an old tube style portable phonograph at a garage sale. It is an Emerson model P1907. When I brought it home and powered it up, all I got was loud 60 hz hum and no music from the speakers. The player also had lots of cosmetic damage, such as a broken grille and missing leather papering I decided to fix this record player and restore it, so that is what I will be doing in this instructable. There will be one of my YouTube videos accompanying almost every step to give the reader a visual demonstration of what is being done to the record player. Lets get started!

Step 1: Diagnosing the Problem

Picture of Diagnosing the Problem
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When I bought this record player, there were many problems with it, so the first logical step I took was to disassemble the record player an remove the chassis. the tube warmed up when the record player was turned on, which showed me that the problem wasn't the tube, so I opened up the chassis and started mapping what I saw. By carefully studying all the components and using a multimeter, I was able to completely draw a schematic of what I saw inside the record player. By drawing a schematic, I was able to know where all the components went and how to diagnose the problem. Because all I heard on the speaker was 60 hz hum, I was able to know that the problem was most likely leaky capacitors.

MikB3 years ago

Nice work -- this deck looks exactly like a "Monarch" branded deck I have in a VERY old "Westminster" gramophone-radio -- also valve based. I think the actual deck is made by BSR, and branded by others.

http://www.vintage-radio.net/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=26709&d=1246114106

Excellent work. Kudos especially for repairing that machine on essentially zero budget. I never would have thought of hand-building a replacement cartridge from found materials.

3366carlos3 years ago

wow

seamster3 years ago

Nicely done! I have a lot of respect for anyone that can diagnose and fix electronics like this. Very cool to see the end result! :)