book collections email follower instructable user
Picture of Reclaimed Wood Vent Hood

We bought our house and have completely flipped several of the rooms in it. The kitchen was an eyesore when we first moved in, but my wife has worked her magic and dreamt up an amazing set up! We both wanted a custom wooden vent hood above our range, but the prices were so dang expensive that we decided to go the DIY route. Unfortunately, creating a cheap-yet-stunning hood that vented to the outside was rather difficult to find plans for. That said, I pulled principles and styles from several designs and created what you see here. Hope it helps!!

Step 1: Make Your Plan

Picture of Make Your Plan
1.JPG

Like I stated above, I researched the mess out of what I wanted this vent hood to look like. That said, there are some similar ones online, but this is a bit of a fusion between them. I started by finding the halfway points between my cabinets, found the midpoints of the vent we bought, then began playing with the angle I wanted on the vent body. Once I determined all these points, I drew on the wall in pencil, stood back and thought, "Yeah, I like that."

gseiler17 days ago
I hope for your sake you never have a fire on the hob as that will go up like you wouldn't believe - this is NOT a good idea.
My wife had an pan of oil overheat on the hob and ignite, it completely melted every piece of plastic in the stainless steel hood and the smoke damage was unreal (complete redecoration of the kitchen). These things do happen.
Please also think the fumes you are extracting away are full of oil residue (take a look at the filters after a few weeks) and this will saturate the wood over time and make the whole thing even more flammable.
If i was you I would take this down immediately and go to a metal solution.
LumberBear (author)  gseiler17 days ago
Thank you for your concern. I've since been checking into clear, fire retardant sealant and will likely be pursuing this in the future. That would also be my recommendation for anyone else concerned with fire safety regarding this Instructable.
Furthermore, all hood vent filters ought to be cleaned of the flammable residue. Thank you for your story--we should all learn from it.
I could not help noticing that the outlet of the vent seems right underneath a ventilation mesh of sorts. This is the next possible desaster if true. if a pot catches fire, your fan will throw flames and heat straigt out of the piping and possibly right in to the mesh above.

a proper way of doing this is to extend the piping and ensure that the outlet is far away from any combustionable materials.
MarkS941yesterday
This is really quality work. I love the idea. Your instructions are thorough and easy to follow. Thanks for this great plan!
Isn't it wonderful when you're able to easily repurpose some scrap wood that's just lying around the house to make something useful out of it! And it'll be easy enough to fix and replace if this one has issues later on too! Excellent job mate!
If lack of space in your kitchen is worrying you then it’s time for you to be extremely elated with the oncoming of slide out range hood
RickAngus17 days ago
What model vent fan unit did you use? It looks like the perfect size to fit my kitchen. After some use, do you feel taht it hs adequate flow? Thanks for your good instructable.
TimmJohn17 days ago
Looks great. It looks like you are using a true hood liner and not adding wood to a regular over the range hood. You will not need to use special sealant on the wood. You will have to use special sealant for the duct work going out through the wall to the outdoors. This is the red-orange stove pipe caulk, not the spray in foam. The majority of the hood liners are tested and listed for use with any combustible material as long as you are following the instructions on the distance from the metal parts to the wood (or other combustible). May you enjoy it for a long time.
ThereseO218 days ago
Looks good BUT!! Is this Fire proof or did you have some way to treat the wood to make it so?
If so what did you use?
LumberBear (author)  ThereseO217 days ago
Thank you for your concern. I've since been checking into clear, fire retardant sealant and will likely be pursuing this in the future. That would also be my recommendation for anyone else concerned with fire safety regarding this Instructable.
haroun17 days ago
Are wooden hoods a thing now? Seems like an awful lot of flammable material to hang over the stove to me. One material you used, the spray foam is also a very dangerous thing should there be a fire as the foam readily burns & creates dense & choking smoke. There is a fire resistant version of the foam, it comes out of the can orange red.
LumberBear (author)  haroun17 days ago
Thank you for your concern. I've since been checking into clear, fire retardant sealant and will likely be pursuing this in the future. That would also be my recommendation for anyone else concerned with fire safety regarding this Instructable.
Also, I just like the look of wood vs metal.
AnandM5417 days ago
Cool idea and nicely did it!!
I recall putting in a window in a kitchen and opening the wall to find a water pipe in my way. Your solution was spot on! And a great result for the final look.
HIGH 10.jpg
jpmarth18 days ago
Nice accent to the kitchen. I’m a fan of the stain choice! It’s not too overpowering, but makes it stand out just enough.
Cliffsclips18 days ago
What a great addition to your kitchen. I bet it brings some good comments when you are entertaining.
That turned out so nice! I admit I like that much more than the standard stainless steel hoods. :)